Saturday, 23 September 2017 21:37

A letter to the CDC

The European Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) recently announced a new list of the thirty most dangerous infectious diseases, which included Lyme Borreliose (LB). According to the American CDC, LB is the fastest spreading vector-borne disease in North America. Recently a group of 15 authors even publicly admitted that the current serological tests are so unreliable that they encourage to stop testing most patients with suspected infection. Then why is the available direct DNA test for Lyme not made available to the public in order to detect LB infection as early as possible? This question was asked to the new director of the CDC.
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The article 'To test or not to test? Laboratory support for the diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis' by Dessau et al. was published on September 5, 2017. It admits something that chronic Lyme patients have known for decades: the current serological tests are invalid. However, instead of relying upon clinical diagnosis because of these poor quality tests, or using many of the more sensitive testing options that are available, the 15 authors rush to draw an odd conclusion: “Let’s limit the use of the very inaccurate tests only to those people who show the few symptoms found under the surveillance case definition for Lyme borreliosis."

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In the USA an unprecedented anti-trust law suit of $57 million is being prepared against the CDC. They are accused of deliberately suppressing the use of an accurate DNA direct diagnostics for Lyme disease. You can read about the aim and potential impact of this lawsuit in this article.

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Innatoss Laboratories has received nearly two million euro subsidy from the European Union to develop a better test for Lyme diagnostics together with 3 European partners. According to its director Anja Garritsen, anybody can become a new Lyme patient tomorrow. The risk of being infected by a tick bite is increasing and with the current state of technology and knowledge, odds are that the acute infection will not be found and will thus become chronic. We went to interview miss Garritsen. 

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